Planning a successful Wedding

Planning a successful Wedding

Wedding planning is a very delicate balancing act. First and foremost, bride and groom must see eye-to-eye. Secondly, if other people are involved, their feelings and opinions may not correspond to the couple’s. Thirdly, social distancing and all that goes with it are nowadays part of the mix.

Bride and Groom

In many cases, the bride and bride’s family will be the prime movers in the planning. The groom usually likes the plans run past him, but often doesn’t want deeper involvement.

However, the bride shouldn’t go against his wishes – or behind his back – and risk an altercation on – or after – the wedding day!

Actually, don’t assume that no areas will interest the groom. He will probably want some sort of input into the catering and the venue. Bridesmaids’ dresses may possibly interest him less.

So the bride should try and keep him in the picture. The couple should discuss any issues – amicably! They both need to agree on the venue and officiant.

So let the groom participate in the planning, if he wants to. Accept that not every groom will be enthused, though. Give-and-take may be the order of the day(s).

Wedding Party

Of course, others may be playing a part. If we have a team, do we include bridesmaid, flower-girl, usher, Best Man, parent, and so on, in the planning? If so, how much notice should be paid to their views?

The bottom line is that the wedding is the couple’s affair, so whatever they want ought to count. Even if someone else is bankrolling the affair, it is still the couple’s big day.

However, if they are expecting others to contribute (whether financially or as an active participant), there may be a need for some compromise. Consultation is important. Nobody should be forced to go against their wishes or take on a role they’re really unwilling to adopt.

The middle course may be the order of the day. Possibly, somebody who might otherwise be overlooked could be invited to read a poem. Perhaps a moody youngster can be put in charge of the wedding presents. A bridesmaid, reluctant to wear a certain dress, can be given a bunch of flowers in recompense.

Most families are willing – and able – to reach a balance, and a wonderful day can be had by all.

If you have any thoughts or questions arising from this, feel free to contact me.

Wedding Fails

Wedding Fails

As last week’s blog (about outstanding ceremonies) seemingly aroused some curiosity, I thought I’d continue the thread. This time it’s about things that didn’t quite go to plan …

This example takes some beating, I think.

Maybe not the right sort of Conduct

I am aware how busy the month before the wedding is likely to be for the couple. So, I always aim to work with them well ahead of time. Then we can sort out a perfect order of service a good few weeks before the actual ceremony without pressure. That leaves them free to concentrate on other needs.

We may not speak again until the big day, except that I give them a call the week of the wedding, mostly  for mutual reassurance.

On this occasion, I rang the bride four days prior to the ceremony. I asked if she was excited, and she said “no”. I was rather taken aback. She asked whether Dennis hadn’t told me? (Dennis – not real name – was the groom.) No, he hadn’t made any contact.

Well, it turns out that the wedding was off, as Dennis had been caught in flagrante!

I couldn’t believe that he was preparing to make his marriage vows in a few days’ time while already unfaithful!

Not even as a joke …

I arrived early – as always – for one of my weddings. It was at the Royal Box, Epsom (no royalty could make it, unfortunately!). It wasn’t long before the groom arrived, extremely nervous. As I normally do, I made small talk with him to try and make him more relaxed.

“I can see you’re nervous – I’ll bet you’ve forgotten the rings,” I said insouciantly.

He turned pale.

“You’re right. I left them in the hotel.”

He managed to fetch them and return before the (tardy) bride arrived; all was well in the end.

Communication Breakdown

One summer wedding in Brixton turned awkward when the bride was late – very late – for her wedding. After 20-30 minutes, the best man tried to contact her, but there was no phone reception. When some wag suggested that the bride might not be going to appear, the groom started having kittens. I offered to get him a glass of water, and he agreed.

I left my spot and went across the hall to the kitchen. Having poured out some water, I found my entry barred because the bride had suddenly arrived and was processing in! How was I to get to the front without detracting from the bride’s entrance?

Luckily, I managed to sneak round the side and arrived at my post just before the rather surprised bride!

It turns out that the driver had got lost and, as we realised, there was no Wifi in the venue!

The vast majority of my ceremonies are well-prepared and go smoothly. If something does go wrong, it’s usually sorted or forgotten quickly enough.

Have a chat with me to see how we can get you hitched without a hitch!

Planning a Successful Wedding

Planning a Successful Wedding

Wedding planning is a very delicate balancing act. First and foremost, bride and groom must see eye-to-eye. Secondly, other people may well be involved, and their feelings and opinions may not correspond to the couple’s. Thirdly, there is social distancing and all that goes with it to bargain for.

Bride and Groom

In many cases, the bride and bride’s family will be the prime movers in the planning. The groom usually likes the plans run past him, but often doesn’t want deeper involvement.

However, the bride shouldn’t go against his wishes – or behind his back – and risk an altercation on – or after – the wedding day!

Actually, don’t assume that no areas will interest the groom. He will probably want some sort of input into the catering and the venue. Bridesmaids’ dresses may possibly interest him less.

So the bride should try and keep him in the picture. The couple should discuss any issues – amicably! They both need to agree on the venue and officiant.

So let the groom participate in the planning, if he likes. Accept that it may not enthuse him that much, though. Give-and-take may be the order of the day(s).

Wedding Party

Of course, others may be playing a part. Do we include bridesmaid, flower-girl, usher, Best Man, parent, and so on, in the planning? How much notice should be paid to their views?

The bottom line is that the wedding is the couple’s affair, so whatever they want ought to count. Even if someone else is bankrolling the affair, it is still the couple’s big day.

However, if they are expecting others to contribute (whether financially or as an active participant), there may need to be some compromise. Consultation is important. Nobody should be forced to go against their wishes or take on a role they’re really unwilling to adopt.

The middle course may be the order of the day. Possibly, somebody who might otherwise be overlooked could be invited to read a poem, say. Perhaps a moody youngster can be put in charge of the wedding presents. A bridesmaid, reluctant to wear a certain dress, can be given a bunch of flowers in recompense.

Social Distancing

You don’t need me to point out that it is currently well-nigh impossible to plan for a big, or even, moderate-sized, wedding. If you don’t know how many guests you will be allowed to invite, how can you book the venue, catering, entertainment etc.?

So it may be an idea to marry legally (ie small register office ceremony) as soon as you wish. Then celebrate the ceremony (officiated by your civil celebrant of choice) and reception you really wanted a year down the line (on your first anniversary, say).

Eventually …

Whenever you are able to marry as you want, remember that it is likely to be a team effort.

Most families are willing – and able – to reach a balance, and a wonderful day is had by all.

If you have any thoughts or questions arising from this, feel free to contact me.

Wedding Roles

Wedding Roles

I hesitate every time I sit down to pen a blog about weddings these days. Will it be relevant to you, my reader? And what COVID-19 regulation is going to spring up and invalidate my comment?

To be fair, even before March, things had been evolving in the wedding world. The bride wearing white was no longer a given. Some chose to marry at the seashore. Many were writing their own vows.

So I’m not going to be prescriptive, but I’d like to define the roles that could be played at weddings post-2020. And I’m making no assumptions about social distancing.

Bride and Groom

There’s a little positive stuff for the couple to do apart from just turning up and “tying the knot”.

The bride will not normally be around when the guests arrive, so it should be down to the groom to welcome them. Otherwise, he will wait with the celebrant for his bride to sweep in.

He may have a few things to say during the ceremony, but his main role, apart from that, will be to give a speech at the reception – if there is one at all.

The bride will be the star of the show, of course. She should relish the attention!

Depending on arrangements (and social distancing), the couple should try and speak to every guest at some point during the event. At the least, they should thank their guests for attending.

These days, the bride may deliver a speech too (another example of the evolution I spoke of).

The couple may well have at least the first dance together.

Bride’s Father

The bride’s father’s role (apart from a financial one, possibly!) may well be to welcome the guests at the start of the reception.

He should keep it short, say how happy he is this day and thank the guests for coming.

Best Man

Nowadays (further evolution!) you can come across “Best Women”, but I hope I will be forgiven, if I refer only to “Best Man” for simplicity’s sake.

The Best Man may play a minor role – the minimum of his tasks is normally to liaise between the groom and the venue or suppliers. He may also have to do something on spec, like fetching a glass of water for the groom. He should generally look after the groom and help him control his nerves.

Additionally, he may serve as a toastmaster (“please assemble for the photographs now” etc.).

The Best Man’s main public role is normally giving the speech at the reception. Though groom-centred, it should not omit mention of the bride, if at all possible. If all the talk is about the groom, there is a risk of excluding about half the guests after a while.

The Best Man should aim at about 10 minutes, and, although humour is more than welcome, malicious, crude or controversial comments are not.

Other roles

I am not going to do more than mention flower-girls, bridesmaids or ushers. They will probably not be able to play a part in most weddings for the foreseeable future (or even longer).

So there it is.

Roles may matter to you, depending on how traditional you want your ceremony to be, but, if you are having them, then it’s good to honour friends and/or relatives by sharing them out judiciously.

Do make sure they understand your expectations, though!

Don’t forget that you can always have a chat with your celebrant, if you’re not sure how to go about things.

Style Tips for the Soon to Be Wed Groom

Style Tips for the Soon to Be Wed Groom

I’m delighted to invite another expert to write for me this week! It’s Emma Miller from vowtobechic.com, and she’s got some sage advice for grooms.

Your wedding day is coming up, and you have a few jobs to get done to keep your bride-to-be happy. One of your primary chores is going to get the tuxedos for you and your groomsmen. 

As you get ready to choose your attire, you want to consider a few style tips that are going to be essential to your wardrobe. You may want to bring a few of your groomsmen along with you unless, of course, they have the exact sense of style as you do. Or, none at all. 

You need some style tips that can help you hit a home run on your wedding day with your bride and everyone else in attendance. 

Have a look below. 

  1. Lose the Belt 

On your wedding day, you don’t want to be stuck fiddling with a belt all day long. Therefore, lose the belt completely. Many style articles, speak about how it is much better to find a tailor to make sure your pants fit perfectly. You will find tips on whether a belt is necessary and whether you are better off doing without. 

When you get married, fashion tips suggest that you should do away with the belt. While the tailor is getting your pants fitted properly, have them remove the belt loops. You won’t be needing them.

2. Tie it

Whether you are going with a bowtie or necktie, make sure you know how to tie it. One major faux pas of getting dressed for a wedding is wearing a pre-tied or clip-on tie or bowtie. You check out an article here to help you determine if you are going to go with a tie or bowtie

Make sure whatever you choose to wear on your wedding day that you learn how to tie it so that you don’t have a pre tied look or the clip-on look that will seriously discredit your attire.

3. Accessorize Accordingly

Choosing accessories is a difficult choice when you are the groom. You want to make an impact, but you also want to make sure what you wear is going to “fit in.” If you want for both you and your groomsmen to match in accessories, you can find some ideas here https://www.groomsmengiftsource.com/ that will be ideal for the groomsmen gift. 

If you are the one to provide the accessories, then you don’t need to worry about everyone choosing their own and looking mismatched. Just make sure to choose something that goes with your tuxedo and wedding theme. Plain silver or gold is a good choice.

4.Shoes

Like most things, when it comes to fashion, you may not have thought much about your shoes. Shoes are an important thing to think about because whether you know it or not, they make or break an outfit. Therefore, don’t wait until the day before the wedding to go pick out shoes. 

You need to pick the right shoes for your wedding, and it can be a chore because you need to pick good shoes that are comfortable.  Keep in mind that you have to wear those shoes all day long. Make sure they are comfortable and well broken in.

5. Be You

Your wedding isn’t the day to try out new hair color, hair cut or anything else of a such. You don’t want to debut a new you, and you want to be the best you. There are some excellent wedding hair tips for the grooms that you may want to keep in mind. 

The most important thing to be aware of is that you should just be you. Don’t be outlandish, don’t be exotic or try new things. The best foot you can put forward is the one that makes you who you are. 

6. Consider your Options

A common trend for brides is to have a different dress or alter their wedding dress for the reception. You have that option too. As a groom, consider how you want to be presented or feel at the reception. You want to be comfortable. If the bride changes up for the party, you should too. 

You can find some great clothing options for the reception that you can choose from. Talk to your bride. Find out what she is doing and follow suit, literally. You will feel much more comfortable at your reception if you have a plan.

When it comes to your wedding, you want to be sure that you are ready and look your best. Follow these fashion tips to help you look your best on your wedding day and avoid any faux pas that you might otherwise have not thought about.